Top tips for being interviewed by B2B press

Key Media has one of the most impressive rosters of B2B publications in the world – and our dedicated team of journalists are always on the lookout to interview the most insightful, engaging and inspiring industry figures.

So – what if you’ve been approached by a B2B publication who would like to interview you? It’s a great opportunity for exposure … but it might seem a little daunting at first.

Relax. Our top tips will show you how to put your best foot forward …

  1. ARRANGE A TIME THAT SUITS YOU

Morning full of meetings? Juggling a thousand things at once? That’s probably not the best time to squeeze in a media interview.

Choose a time that’s a little less busy than the others – or at least a time when you won’t be overly distracted! You want to project your best self, and the journalist wants to write about your best self. Setting the right time aside is a vital part of that process.

  1. GET THE QUESTIONS IN ADVANCE

You may be a master of the off-the-cuff improv exchange – but, even so, it still can’t hurt to ask your interviewer for a list of questions in advance.

The list probably won’t be comprehensive – most interviews allow a little ‘drifting space’ to talk around subjects naturally – but it will at least give a good idea of what’s in store. Even if it turns out to be wholly unneeded, unneeded prep is always better than sorely-needed prep, right?

  1. SIMPLE ANSWERS, CENTRAL POINTS

Your interviewer – or whoever gets the lucky task of transcribing your interview – will thank you for this one: keep your responses simple and focused.

This isn’t to say that you should give robotic ‘yes’ or ‘no’ responses – and if you’re in a conversational mood, feel free to ramble – but a good journalist will be angling to find the central point in your answer anyway. Why not cut to the chase and give it to them?

  1. SELL YOURSELF

You’re the focus here – so even if the topic of the interview is a wider subject in general, don’t be afraid to slip in some promotion for yourself!

Keeping it tactful always helps … but journalists will expect you to engage in some self-selling for you or your organisation. It’s part of the deal: you give your expertise, people get to find out who you are and what you have to offer.

  1. FOLLOW UP AND PROMOTE

Remember that, for a journalist, interviewing someone and publishing their story is an everyday occurrence. The publication date for your interview will be just one of dozens they’re dealing with – so sometimes communication post-discussion can fall by the wayside.

It’s always a good idea to check in after the interview – first with a generalised ‘is there anything else you need from me?’ request, secondly with a request for notification when the story goes live. This will keep you both updated and on the journalist’s radar – which will mean you’re at the forefront of their mind as an interviewee in similar future stories.

 

 

Categories